Interview with Occult Horror Author, Sarah England.

Sarah England

Sarah England

Today I’m happy to welcome Sarah England to the blog. Sarah is an author of dark occult horror books that send a chill down your spine. She is currently busy putting the finishing touches to the third book in her trilogy, Magda, which will be available at Halloween – spooky! If you haven’t read Sarah’s previous books, Father of Lies and Tanner’s Dell, then I highly recommend them. Lets find out some more about Sarah:

Hi Mark! Thank you for inviting me onto your blog – I really appreciate it.

What were your favourite childhood books?
I was introduced to reading at a very young age by my mother, who was an English teacher – I can remember reading her cast-off Victoria Holts and Georgette Heyers in the back of our Cortina on rainy English holidays… I actually loved them…guess I started off being unusual way back then. My very first books were the Miffy books – so much so my nickname was Miffy. I also loved Enid Blyton’s Famous Five and Secret Sevens series…showing my age here, whoops!

Was there any interest in the supernatural when you were younger?
I got freaked out so easily and so badly my dad was a bit worried about me. I saw a film on Christmas Eve at the age of five where one of the presents under the tree was a doll, and as the family switched off the light for bed and closed the door, the doll’s eyes snapped open and its head span round on its stem. I hated dolls after that and wouldn’t have them in my room. Also, I was convinced the wardrobe door would open and would watch it on full alert until my parents came to bed in the next room. However, what really tipped me over the edge was my first ever boyfriend taking me to see the Exorcist age 17. I’ve been terrified of the supernatural ever since.

hat-manDuring your career in nursing did you experience anything occult in nature?
There were a lot of stories around in hospitals – mostly when we were staffing a ward at night …great when you had to go into a side ward with a terminally ill patient in the small hours…but the most common was that patients who were about to die would miraculously seem to get better the day before, and then deteriorate rapidly after that. This happened so many times it almost became an omen. But the other thing was – again when someone was about to die – they visibly brightened and stared at a far point no one else could see. Some said the man in the black hat had been to visit. All common stories and personally witnessed. I never saw a ghost though! That came later – a lot later. Continue reading

Book review of Portraits of the Dead by John Nicholl

PortraitsBook Description:
Emma didn’t know how long he hid, silent and unmoving, in the large Victorian wardrobe to the side of her single bed. She didn’t know how long he peered, salivating and drooling, between the two heavy dark oak doors, and watched, mesmerised, as she slowly drifted into fitful sleep. She didn’t know what time he pushed the doors open and crept towards her in the drab grey darkness of the night.

Detective Inspector Gravel finds himself floundering when a local nineteen-year-old university student is abducted and imprisoned by a sadistic serial killer, who has already tortured and killed at least five young women.

The greater the evil, the more deadly the game… How far would you go to save your life?

 

Extract:
When she first awoke from her enforced slumber, Emma thought for one glorious, but all too fleeting moment, that the events of the previous night were just a nightmare. But the invasive throbbing pain seemingly erupting from every inch of her face and the congealed blood around her nose and mouth bought reality into sharp unrelenting focus, as she realised that one swollen eye wouldn’t open and reluctantly recalled events prior to the assault. Oh God, it was real. It was all too real! Life had taken a dark and unexpected turn.

 

4.5* book review:
This is another excellent novel from John Nicholl. Although a stand alone, this novel continues the author’s exploration of how the criminal mind and it’s actions have an impact on their victims minds and personalities. In this case a university student is kidnapped and kept in a windowless room, and tormented by the kidnapper.

I thought that the portrayal of the working relationships between the police team investigating the missing girl came across well. I also like how there were references made back to the arrest of Dr Galbraith (from White is the Coldest Colour.) I did think however, that there were some parts of the story that didn’t feature the missing girl that perhaps would have benefited from a chapter here and there with her in – just to let readers know more about her situation.

The best parts of the book were those that featured the antagonist. John writes a really good bad guy, and this one is sick and twisted. There are a few scenes that shock, but they are not over done and fit in with what is happening in the plot.

I also liked how the story kept taking me in directions I wasn’t expecting, and I didn’t see that ending coming either! This is a dark, twisted psychological thriller written by a brilliant imagination.

I received an ARC copy of the book in exchange for a honest review.

 

Portraits of the Dead is now available on Amazon for £1.99
You can find John across social media on Facebook, Twitter and his website.

As always, thank you for reading,

All the best,

Mark.