How authors can make the most out of social media.

If you’ve never had an account on social media, you’re probably wondering what’s the point and how you can make best use of these sites. Some focus on text, some on sharing images, and it can look like a lot of extra work on top of writing your next book. In this post, I’m sharing some articles I’ve found useful when trying to get to grips with author social media – because to ignore social media is to miss the chance to be where the majority of your potential readership is.

One of the best resources for authors, and especially for helping with using social media, is Jane Friedman’s blog. She has written a number of articles, and in So You’re an Author Without a Social Media Presence: Now What? she discusses the benefits of testing the water and discovering how useful social media can be for authors. There are also links in this article to other posts about selling books through social media and how to build an author platform. Continue reading

5 Things I’ve Learnt as an Author.

Today I’d like to talk about some of the things I’ve learnt since I’ve been writing. I hope sharing my experiences will help other authors.

Don’t pay for things you don’t need to.
There are many people out there who claim to be miracle workers when it comes to marketing books, or getting more book reviews. Most are not, and should be avoided. I had many people approach me when I started writing trying to market my first book, claiming they could send the book shooting up the Amazon charts with no proof of any previous successes.

Book marketing is a steep learning curve that I’m still on, but much of what is offered by these ‘services’ can be done yourself. Offering your book for free on Amazon, for example – you can set this up yourself and make social media posts telling people about it. Book reviews shouldn’t be paid for – Amazon will remove reviews if they believe they’ve been bought, rather than given by a genuine reader. You can approach book bloggers with your book description and cover and ask if they’d be interested in reviewing it for you. Make sure the bloggers you ask read the same genres you write in, to ensure you get more positive responses.

 

Write your book how YOU want to:
What’s the best way to write your book? On Word? With Scrivener? Plan every detail, or just have a rough idea of the story? It’s all up to you – whatever works best. I write in Word because that’s what I’m used to, and I don’t see any benefit from changing to Scrivener. The most important thing is that you’ve got an idea and you want to write it. Don’t feel as though you need to use everything that is suggested to you. If you’ve read books telling you how to write a book and you get something out of it, then great, but it isn’t necessary to read them. You can help yourself though, by reading a variety of authors and picking out what does and doesn’t work in their writing. Continue reading

Double blog tour thanks!

Both The Revelation Room and The Eyes of the Accused were recently re-launched by Bloodhound Books, and a week-long blog tour accompanied each publication.

I wanted to give my heartfelt thanks to all the book bloggers who took part in both tours. Each of you gave up your time to read, review and share your thoughts on both books across social media.

Without the invaluable work of book bloggers, authors wouldn’t be able to spread the word about their work. They help with exposure, getting people talking, and encouraging people to pick up books and read them. This takes each blogger a considerable amount of time, for which they don’t get paid – they do what they do for the love of books. Not only that, but the blogging community is very supportive, and those who didn’t take part on the Whittle tours either shared or re-tweeted the reviews that were part of them. Massive thanks to everyone who helped in any way with each tour.

Below are links to the blogs of the people who took part in the tours. I recommend you have a look through them for some really great reviews and book recommendations:

 

Amy writes reviews at Novel Gossip 

Dee writes over on Novel Deelights

Susan posts reviews on Books From Dusk till Dawn

Shell reviews over on Chelle’s Book Reviews

Mark posts reviews on Mark Wilson Books

Sarah reviews on By the Letter Book Reviews

Jen writes on Jen Med’s Book Reviews

Sam posts reviews on Clues and Reviews

Kate reviews over at The Quiet Knitter

Noelle posts reviews on Crime Book Junkie

Ronnie writes reviews at Ronnie Turner

Sean reviews over on Sean’s Book Reviews

Kerry Ann reviews at Chat About Books

Chandra writes over on Where the Reader Grows

Jill posts reviews on Books ‘n’ All

 

Once again, thanks to everyone who took part, and I look forward to reading your future reviews and blog posts.

Best wishes,

Mark.

 

Thanks for a Successful Blog Tour!

The Abattoir of Dreams blog tour has recently finished, and I just wanted to say a BIG thank you to all 21 bloggers who took part. You all gave up your time to read, review, share extracts, and share your reviews across social media. All this done for the love of books, and for free. You all helped to spread the word about the book, and encouraged people to buy and read it. Words can’t express how much I appreciate your support.

I also wanted to share the reviews from the blog tour, so below is a list of all the bloggers who took part, and a link to their review of The Abattoir of Dreams.

Noelle, blogging at https://crimebookjunkie.co.uk/2017/02/the-abattoir-of-dreams-blog-tour-review/

Sarah Hardy, blogging at https://bytheletterbookreviews.com/2017/02/23/the-abattoir-of-dreams-by-mark-tilbury/

Sarah Kenny, blogging at https://sarahjk79.wixsite.com/thegreatbritishbook/single-post/2017/02/23/The-Abbatoir-of-Dreams  Continue reading

Self-Publishing Myths

Today, I thought I’d talk about some of the common myths I’ve come across in the self-publishing world.

typewriterYou can write a book by yourself.
Selling platforms such as Amazon and Smashwords have given a large number of people the opportunity to publish their books. This has allowed many more writers the chance to showcase their abilities, but as the old saying goes, ‘no man is an island.’ A writer needs to have a team of beta readers and an editor to point out what needs improving or changing. Extra pairs of eyes may see things you have missed, and they can give an impartial opinion on the plot, flow and character development.

Then there’s making your book look as appealing as possible. The general consensus regarding book covers is unless you are a talented graphic artist, then you should seek help with designing a ‘look’ for your book. The interior appearance of a book is also important. Formatting a book for Kindle can be a complicated and frustrating process. Unless you want your readers getting annoyed with chapters starting half way down the Kindle screen, or too many spaces between words, find some help. JJ Marsh and Jane Davis discuss this myth in their blog post ‘Self Publishing Myths – Busted.’

 

partner_logosYou can upload your book and people will find it.
The majority of indie authors upload their books to Amazon, along with other platforms such as Smashwords, Barnes and Noble, and KOBO. Just uploading your finished book doesn’t mean it will sell. Yes, the occasional reader may come across it and download it, but that won’t lead to many sales. As I found out, you have to do A LOT of research about book publicity and marketing.

Just because someone, or a company, say they are book publicists, doesn’t mean they do the job well. Unfortunately, there are many ‘publicists’ who receive payment from authors for their marketing services, and then deliver very little in return. Again, research is needed. Drill down into what a potential publicist can provide in terms of visits to your Amazon page and book sales before paying for anything. Ask for recommendations from other authors who have had successful promotions. Who did they use and why? You can find some excellent advice about finding a publicist and working with them in Jane Friedman’s blog post ‘How to Find and Work With a Book Publicist – Successfully.’ Continue reading