The Key to Death’s Door or Anywhere Else.

 

The publication date for The Key to Death’s Door has been moved forward to Monday 16th April. With this in mind, I asked authors and bloggers: If you could have the key to anywhere or anything, what would you open, and why? You can find some of the best answers below, and learn more about everyone by clicking on their names.

 

Mark Wilson: To my gran’s house in 1980. Just to see her…and maybe get the recipe for her soup. Most Scottish homemade soups are a version of scotch broth. Was amazing and none of us know how to recreate it. We all have different version, which suits our different meteorites of it and her, I suppose.

Oh, I’d like one for the Vatican vaults as well, please. See what those mad bastards got up to through the ages

Alison (AB) Morgan: I would like the key to the records room in an old Victorian asylum. Imagine the stories to be found…sad, bad and mad. Juicy!

Tara Lyons: I’d want the key to heaven. Just so that, every now and then, I could pop up there and have a chat with my grandad. I miss our chats – all the things he would teach me and the stories he’d tell me about his youth. Although he only died three years ago, I have a feeling there’s so much I didn’t know.

Joel Hames-Clarke: I would like the key to Stephen King’s Box of Infinite Ideas, JK Rowling’s Magical Prose Generator, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Perfection Press. I would also appreciate the keys to a number of prominent politicians and journalists, so that I could just switch them off, or at least put them in neutral for a while.

AJ Waines: I’d like the key to The Secret Garden as portrayed in the spellbinding book by Frances Hodgson Burnett. It’s my favourite childhood book and I’d love to be able to step into the magic of it for real… ooh, I’ve gone all tingly at the thought!

Jon Richter: This is an ace idea!! I’ll go for the keys to Area 51 please… I want to see inside their big warehouse where they keep all the salvaged alien tech and the Ark of the Covenant.

Terry Hetherington: When the weather is cold, you know 9 months in a UK year I’d like a key to open a door to a warm quiet beach haven. For peace & quiet & relaxation with my kindle/book & no time lost so it seems as if I’ve only been gone minutes when I’ve actually had 3-4 hours of me time. Heaven

Lucinda Lamont: A key to revisit your favourite life experience. For me, I did a skydive over the Everglades and I would love to get that feeling for the first time, one more time.

Kelly Lacey:  would like a key to visit my loved ones in heaven. It would be heartwarming and reassuring.

Mary Snaddon: I’d like the key to unlock my husband’s brain cos I kid you not, he never fails to surprise me with his stupidity when he’s really rather clever. Extremely clever in fact and extremely stooooopid at the same time. That’s a talent really I suppose.

Llainy Swanson:  Good question.  I want to be all philosophical and say the universe but imagine that power?  Knowing with certainty how the world came to be.  How many spiritual beings are out there, why they came to be, what is the purpose of it all.  That could break a mind, warp a mind or maybe help shape the world into a better place because you would have the answers to it all.  Sorry for typos, on my way home.  my blog is

Graham Smith: I’d like the key to the safe where the cure to cancer is secreted.

Abby Jayne Slater: If I could have the key to anywhere or anything, it would be Idris Elba’s house. Is that too stalkery????

Val Portelli: I would like the key to writer’s paradise, where there are no interruptions and every word written magically self-edits. Fairies supply food and drink, the elves do the housework, Unicorns listen entranced as I tell my stories, and dragons fly all over the world distributing my books.

Owen Mullen: Great idea Mark… I’d like the key to my own time machine. I could travel to the past and the future with ease and answer all the great questions, meet and talk to the greatest heroes and villains – from Jesus Christ to Genghis Khan. Revisit my happiest memories… but more important I could sit my younger self down and tell him not to worry, it was all going to be okay.

Heleyne Hammersley: I’d like the key to my dad’s 1964, dark blue, Ford Anglia. It was our first family car and I spent many happy hours being driven around the country in it.

Caroline Vincent: If I could have a key what would I use it for? So many thoughts and so many uses for that key! I think I’d love to have a key to heaven – to see my father and talk about all those things we planned but never got around to as he died too soon. He could show me my little one – the one I just know he took care of when I was a few months pregnant. And, perhaps I could also see my gran, my father’s mother, one more time and give her a hug.

Kerry Swan: I’d lik th ky that fll off my kyboard.

 

Thank you to everyone who made suggestions and answered my question. I really appreciate your help.

The cover for The Key to Death’s Door will be revealed shortly.

As always, thank you for your support.

Best wishes,

Mark.

Bloodhound Blog Blitz. White is the Coldest Colour by John Nicholl

Follow my blog with Bloglovin
Today I’m pleased to be helping with the blog blitz for White is the Coldest Colour, by John Nicholl. The book has recently been re-launched by Bloodhound Books, who I thank for inviting me to take part. Here’s the book cover and description:

Book Description
Be careful who you trust…

The Mailer family is oblivious to the terrible danger that enters their lives when seven-year-old Anthony is referred to the child guidance service by the family GP, following the breakdown of his parents’ marriage. Fifty-eight-year-old Dr David Galbraith, a sadistic, predatory paedophile, employed as a consultant child psychiatrist, has already murdered one child in the soundproofed cellar below the South Wales Georgian town-house he shares with his wife and two young daughters. When Anthony becomes Galbraith’s latest obsession he will stop at nothing to make his grotesque fantasies reality.

But can Anthony be saved before it’s too late? The book includes content that some readers may find disturbing from the start.

It is dedicated to survivors everywhere. Brilliantly gripping, White is the Coldest Colour will have you hooked from the very first page and holding your breath to the heart-pounding and shocking conclusion. Continue reading

A Year Ago Today.

Today marks the first anniversary of the publication of The Abattoir of Dreams. It’s been a great year! The Ben Whittle Investigations were re-launched, and The Liar’s Promise was published last November. I’m now looking forward to the publication of The Key to Death’s Door on 1st May.

Huge thanks to everyone at Bloodhound Books who do such a great job at supporting and encouraging all of their authors. And to all the readers and bloggers who have been so supportive.

Here’s the book description for The Abattoir of Dreams and some of it’s reviews:

 

Book Description:
The past is never far away.

Michael Tate has not had an easy life. With his father in prison, and his mother dead, Michael was sent to Woodside Children’s Home.

Now an adult, Michael wakes up in hospital from a coma suffering from amnesia and paralysis. Confused and terrified, he is charged with the fatal stabbing of his girlfriend, Becky. He also learns he attempted to end his own life.

Detective Inspector John Carver is determined that Michael is sent to prison.

With no way of defending himself, Michael is left in his hospital bed awaiting transfer to remand.

But then strange things begin to happen and his childhood comes back to haunt him.

Can Michael ever escape the past?

Will he ever discover the truth about Becky’s murder?

And why is DI Carver so eager to make him suffer?

The Abattoir of Dreams is a bitter sweet story of murder, innocence and abuse.

 

Review Quotes:

There is a supernatural(ish) element through the book, which appears to be a side affect of severe head trauma. To that extent, it kind of reminded me a little bit of Stephen King’s ‘Duma Key’ and what happened to Edgar Freemantle after his head trauma. With Michael Tate (our protagonist) we really don’t know if it is real, imaginary, or just the way he manages to cope with his returning memory.
5* from Steve Robb, BookieWookie.

I so admire this book and the author for writing it; not that it’s an easy read, emotionally, as the author masterfully puts the reader through the mill, but it is justified. It’s an exceptionally powerful, well-constructed book, with a story that needed to be told. It reeks of authenticity, more’s the pity. The use of the afterlife in the plot is skillful, beautifully effective and credible. It’s rare for my heart to pound with excitement or fear whilst reading a thriller, but this book made me sweat with concern over the fate of the hero, Mikey. 5* from Joy Mutter, author.

This is a difficult book to define. It seems to have a little bit of everything, and it doesn’t fit neatly into any one genre. If you love suspense novels, you’ll enjoy it. If you love novels with supernatural elements, then you’ll enjoy it. If you love family saga’s, then you’ll enjoy it. There are also small elements of horror and romance. It’s a book that slips easily between all these different genres, making is truly unique.
4* from Kim Ebner, The Buzzing Bookmark.

It’ll horrify you, upset you, and hopefully open your eyes – at times the horror (of a very human kind) is relentless, but then again, perhaps it is in reality too, although we might like to think otherwise. It’s a book that once read cannot be forgotten, it’s a triumph for Tilbury and cements the fact that in reading his books, I’m on a journey with a very talented author. 5* from Shani Struthers, author.

Mark Tilbury has written a roller coaster of a crime thriller for sure, but this novel is also a rich and harrowing story of the psychology of evil and those who strive to stop it, this is certainly one read that will stay with you long after you’ve finished the book. Mark Tilbury is a new author (this is where I kick myself) to me but this certainly won’t be the last book I read by this author. If you enjoy a crime thriller that isn’t the norm and you don’t mind a disturbing read then this book is definitely one you don’t want to miss.
5* from Lorraine Rugman, The Book Review Cafe.

 

If you’d like to find out more about The Abattoir of Dreams you can find it here on Amazon.

As always, thank you for your continued support.

Best wishes,

Mark.

Bloodhound Books Blog Blitz – Stateline by Dave Stanton.

Today, I’m pleased to be helping out with the blog blitz for Stateline by Dave Stanton. Thanks to Sarah Hardy at Bloodhound Books for inviting me to take part. Lets find out more about the book.


Book Description:
Cancel the wedding. The groom is dead.

When a tycoon’s son is murdered the night before his wedding, the grief-stricken father offers private detective Dan Reno a life-changing bounty to find the killer.

Reno, who is nearly broke, decides he’s finally found himself in the right place at the right time. But when a band of crooked cops get involved, Reno finds himself fighting for his life.

Who committed the murder, and why? Which cops can he trust, if any?

Haunted by his murdered father and a violent past, Reno wants no more blood on his hands. But a man’s got to make a living, and backing off is not in his DNA.

Traversing the snowy alpine winter in the Sierras and the lonely deserts of Nevada, Reno must revert to his old ways to survive. Because the bounty won’t do him much good if he’s dead.

Continue reading

Warning! This Blog Post Contains Discussions about Trigger Warnings.

Are more warnings needed in book descriptions?

Is book censorship in danger of limiting creativity and freedom of expression?

 

 

 

I recently watched a discussion unfold on Facebook about whether The Abattoir of Dreams should have trigger warnings in its description. The person who started the discussion stated they had finished the book, thought it was good, but that ‘there really should be a statutory warning on book covers and blurbs, if a book deals extensively with child abuse’.

This comment then led to a debate about the pros and cons of trigger warnings. Trigger warnings are defined as: a statement cautioning that content (as in a text, video, or class) may be disturbing or upsetting.

As the discussion was taking place in a crime fiction group, many people didn’t see the need for warnings as they’d expect topics such as murder and abuse to be included anyway. The overall opinion was that the book description should make the content of the book clear, so that readers are aware of anything they’d prefer not to read before buying the book. I think that this approach is easier for both publishers and indie authors to implement

I asked best-selling crime thriller author, Peter James, for his opinion, and he told me that he never would put warnings on any of his books. His personal belief is that we live in an age where there are far too many warnings anyway. Continue reading