Poetry in Fiction – The Abattoir of Dreams.

I used poetry in The Abattoir of Dreams to explore one of the character’s feelings about the situation he was in and the abusive experiences he’d been through. The poem is written by 14 year-old Liam, who shares it with the main character, Mikey, when they run away from Woodside Children’s Home. The poem was also the inspiration for the title of the book.

Here is the poem in full:

How I wish I could feel,
The hot sun on my back,
Fresh cut grass,
Beneath my feet,
My father’s hand,
Strong upon mine,
His aftershave,
Bottled nostalgia,
Promises of tomorrow,
Safe within his smile,
But the night stalker comes,
Cloaked in shadows,
The sound of his heels,
Marking time on the floor,
His stinking breath,
Whispering threats,
You’d better not tell,
You’d better not scream,
No one can hear you,
In the Abattoir of Dreams.

I felt the poem helped to explain exactly how Liam saw Woodside, and how it made him feel. His poetry also acted as inspiration for Mikey.

When used in the right way/place, poetry can work really well in fiction. Other novels that have used poetry successfully are: Continue reading

Why I Love The Fictional Bad Guy

Ebb-standing“Edward Ebb opened the door and walked a few feet into the Revelation Room. He put the petrol can on the floor and walked back outside and retrieved the shotgun. He aimed it in the general direction of the people cowering in the corner. ‘Good afternoon, bunnies.”

Welcome to Edward Ebb, the fictional bad guy in my first book, The Revelation Room. I love the baddies. They really seem to get my creative juices flowing. The bad guy prowls around in the back of my mind, demanding to be let out. He wants to cause mayhem, and he wants to cause it now! He’s been really patient, watching me plot all the nasty things that I have in store for him and now he can’t wait to get going. He even resents me for holding him back. Why create him, he argues, if he has to sit locked up inside my head like a prisoner on death row? He even accuses me of being no better than him, arguing that he is merely an extension of my own macabre nature. At this point, I generally laugh and try not to sound as nervous as I feel. Continue reading

An Interview with a Fictional Psychopath

Ebb-interview-slihouette

Today’s post is an interview with Edward Ebb, the antagonist from my upcoming book, The Revelation Room. The Revelation Room is the first in a series of psychological mystery thrillers written with a touch of dark humour. Ebb is the psychopathic egocentric leader of The Sons and Daughters of Salvation, a small religious cult who have taken the protagonist’s father captive.

This post was inspired by an interview in which Maggie James asked questions of her antagonist from her book The Second Captive http://www.maggiejamesfiction.com/blog/five-questions-for-a-fictional-sociopath.

1. Hi, Edward. Tell me about The Sons and Daughters of Salvation?

Please address me properly. We are not close enough for you to assume such familiarity. You must call me Father at all times if you want to continue this interview. In answer to your question, I set up the group with Brother Gerald some ten years ago. The idea? To prepare for The Rapture. This is the time of the Second Coming of Jesus Christ to the earth. All dead people of faith will rise, and all true believers still alive shall go with them to meet the Lord. They will then continue on a journey into the Kingdom of Heaven. Non-believers will be left behind. Of course, it’s not simply a matter of faith, because there are many among us who are masquerading as believers. I fear they are in for a rude awakening. They will be ordered to stay behind with the non-believers to face eternal damnation. The Lord has told me to build a spaceship to prepare for this magnificent event. Continue reading