Tilbury Talks To… Llainy Swanson

Today, Tilbury Talks To… Llainy Swanson. Thank you for agreeing to take part today Llainy. Would you please let everyone know a little bit about yourself?

Llainy with ‘This is Going to Hurt’ by Adam Kay.

Hey, thanks for having me.  So, I am a Scottish book worm with a habit of calling everyone Betty (boy, girl, animal – doesn’t matter).  I have loved reading since I was a kid and you can find me, most days, curled up somewhere with Princess Trixie (cat) and a book.

 

What went through your head when you first decided to start your book blog?
I kept buying books I had already read and of course only finding out once I was a decent bit in.  So I started the blog to keep tabs and eventually authors, publishers and PR folk reached out ask asked if I would read/review a book for them.  It was so out of the blue, I was so touched as there are so many amazing bloggers who are really eloquent in their thoughts/writing.  Mine is peppered with some of my daft catchphrases, OMG, Whaaaaaat, ooft etc but readers seem to react well to it.

Have you met any fellow book bloggers in ‘real life’ and what were they like?
Yeah, I met Sharon from “Chapter in my Life” fellow weegie, she is hilarious and lovely.  Sadly the few times I have met her I have had to rush off but online and offline she is lovely and now we are boot twins (she broke her foot today, I broke mine a few weeks back, wee pies lol.)  Shell Baker from Chelles book reviews, OMG she is a crackpot but in the nicest possible way.  If you could bottle her personality and sell it, would be the richest person alive.  She is larger than life, funny, genuine and so sweet.  We finally met at Horrorcon (yeah really) and I can’t wait to have a proper meet up and drink with that crazy cat (and her selfie stick obvs).  Noelle Holten from Crime Book Junkie, she is one of the sweetest wee chops <3  again the twice I have met her I have been away swiftly but the small chats offline and the many online, actually love her.  She is the other half of Twinnie (Sharon is the other one) and she has written a book and it has been given the thumbs up from THEEEEE Martina Cole, ooft – bigger and better things for this wee gem!  I have met others but it has just been a brief hello, or brief gab before a book event. Continue reading

Poetry in Fiction – The Abattoir of Dreams.

I used poetry in The Abattoir of Dreams to explore one of the character’s feelings about the situation he was in and the abusive experiences he’d been through. The poem is written by 14 year-old Liam, who shares it with the main character, Mikey, when they run away from Woodside Children’s Home. The poem was also the inspiration for the title of the book.

Here is the poem in full:

How I wish I could feel,
The hot sun on my back,
Fresh cut grass,
Beneath my feet,
My father’s hand,
Strong upon mine,
His aftershave,
Bottled nostalgia,
Promises of tomorrow,
Safe within his smile,
But the night stalker comes,
Cloaked in shadows,
The sound of his heels,
Marking time on the floor,
His stinking breath,
Whispering threats,
You’d better not tell,
You’d better not scream,
No one can hear you,
In the Abattoir of Dreams.

I felt the poem helped to explain exactly how Liam saw Woodside, and how it made him feel. His poetry also acted as inspiration for Mikey.

When used in the right way/place, poetry can work really well in fiction. Other novels that have used poetry successfully are: Continue reading

Interview with psychological thriller author, John Nicholl

John NichollToday I am really pleased to welcome psychological thriller author, John Nicholl, to the blog. John has previously worked in the police force and child protective social services. His debut novel, White is the Coldest Colour, has become an Amazon Top Ten bestseller. Whilst fictional, it is influenced by what John has witnessed during his work in child protection and features predatory pedophile Dr Galbraith.

Lets begin:

How do you start your writing day and motivate yourself?
It varies from day to day. Some days I feel driven to write for hours, while others are less productive. If I’m not in the mood to write then I do something else instead.

What is it about writing fiction that you enjoy the most?
I like the creative process. Being in control of events is also a positive. Real life is far less predictable as God laughs at our plans.

White

In a previous interview you say that thinking of the title ‘White is the Coldest Colour’ was almost as hard as writing the novel, and that a song helped you. How long were you working on the title and what was the song?
I came up with and rejected at least a dozen titles over an eighteen month period before stumbling upon one I liked enough to keep. ‘White is the Coldest Colour’ came to me when listening to ‘A Whiter Shade of Pale’ on Radio 2. I hope readers will agree that it’s a good fit. Continue reading

Why I Love The Fictional Bad Guy

Ebb-standing“Edward Ebb opened the door and walked a few feet into the Revelation Room. He put the petrol can on the floor and walked back outside and retrieved the shotgun. He aimed it in the general direction of the people cowering in the corner. ‘Good afternoon, bunnies.”

Welcome to Edward Ebb, the fictional bad guy in my first book, The Revelation Room. I love the baddies. They really seem to get my creative juices flowing. The bad guy prowls around in the back of my mind, demanding to be let out. He wants to cause mayhem, and he wants to cause it now! He’s been really patient, watching me plot all the nasty things that I have in store for him and now he can’t wait to get going. He even resents me for holding him back. Why create him, he argues, if he has to sit locked up inside my head like a prisoner on death row? He even accuses me of being no better than him, arguing that he is merely an extension of my own macabre nature. At this point, I generally laugh and try not to sound as nervous as I feel. Continue reading

Interview with mystery author Mike Billington

Mike Billington

 

Today I’d like to welcome mystery and historical fiction author Mike Billington to the blog. Mike is a Vietnam veteran and was a journalist for 50 years before writing fiction. He has 7 books published and is working on 2 more. Thank you Mike for taking part in this interview.

 

 

If you had to pick one, which event that you’ve reported on has been the most influential on your fiction?
That’s a hard question to answer because over the course of nearly 50 years as a reporter I covered a wide variety of stories and many of them had a real impact on me and my writing. I covered the Love Canal environmental disaster, for example, and learned a lot about how ordinary people can rise to great heights when their families are threatened. I spent time living undercover with white-power extremists and learned a lot about how irrational fear can drive people to commit outrageous acts. I think, however, that if I had to choose one event I’d say it was a series of stories that two other reporters and I did on police abuse of the Florida contraband forfeiture law. We started on the project one Sunday night when a guy walked into the newsroom and told us that the police had stolen his boat.

The contraband forfeiture law allows police to confiscate money, property, airplanes, boats, cars and personal possessions from people who are not charged with a crime. To get their stuff back they are forced to sue the police and to win their lawsuits they must prove they are innocent of wrongdoing. That’s a complete perversion of the American concept of justice; it’s also both expensive and time consuming. Over the course of our investigation we learned that cops were taking boats, for example, and using them to go fishing, hold parties, etc. They were taking classic cars and driving them for personal use and they confiscated billions of dollars which they used to buy new equipment and, in one case, to install lights at a church playground. The law was supposed to stop drug lords from using their wealth to hire slick lawyers to beat criminal charges but it was never really used to do that. What is was used for primarily was to, in essence, steal from the public with complete impunity. Of the hundreds of cases we reviewed, not a single “drug lord” had his house or other property confiscated. That project taught me a lot about how both the police bureaucracy and the political system really work and how innocent people can be severely impacted by bad laws. It also taught me how readily societies willingly surrender their rights in exchange for what they consider “security.” That series has had a big influence on the topics I pursue in my novels and how I write them. Continue reading