5 Things I’ve Learnt as an Author.

Today I’d like to talk about some of the things I’ve learnt since I’ve been writing. I hope sharing my experiences will help other authors.

Don’t pay for things you don’t need to.
There are many people out there who claim to be miracle workers when it comes to marketing books, or getting more book reviews. Most are not, and should be avoided. I had many people approach me when I started writing trying to market my first book, claiming they could send the book shooting up the Amazon charts with no proof of any previous successes.

Book marketing is a steep learning curve that I’m still on, but much of what is offered by these ‘services’ can be done yourself. Offering your book for free on Amazon, for example – you can set this up yourself and make social media posts telling people about it. Book reviews shouldn’t be paid for – Amazon will remove reviews if they believe they’ve been bought, rather than given by a genuine reader. You can approach book bloggers with your book description and cover and ask if they’d be interested in reviewing it for you. Make sure the bloggers you ask read the same genres you write in, to ensure you get more positive responses.

 

Write your book how YOU want to:
What’s the best way to write your book? On Word? With Scrivener? Plan every detail, or just have a rough idea of the story? It’s all up to you – whatever works best. I write in Word because that’s what I’m used to, and I don’t see any benefit from changing to Scrivener. The most important thing is that you’ve got an idea and you want to write it. Don’t feel as though you need to use everything that is suggested to you. If you’ve read books telling you how to write a book and you get something out of it, then great, but it isn’t necessary to read them. You can help yourself though, by reading a variety of authors and picking out what does and doesn’t work in their writing. Continue reading

The Mirror Moment

Mirror-moment-blog-imageI thought I might share with you a piece of advice that really helped me with the book I am currently working on. In fact, it changed my whole outlook on the process and the structure of writing. It’s called writing from the middle, or the Mirror Moment. The Mirror Moment is the one scene, slap-bang in the middle of a story, where the main character looks in the mirror (metaphorically speaking) and understands that the odds are so stacked against him that he has virtually nowhere to go. He faces certain death, either literally, professionally or psychologically. What does this reveal? What are its hidden depths? The Mirror Moment is like the earth’s core. Once you know what the Mirror Moment is, you will then know the transformation and pre-story psychology of your main character. Continue reading